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How To Import Google Music Playlist into Spotify

Posted by Arch on March 21, 2019
Import Google Music Playlist into Spotify

Although people no longer tend to switch between music streaming providers as often as they once did, the occasional switch still happens. When it does, the prospect of losing one’s playlists can be upsetting.

Playlists can hold a staggering number of songs. Some people just like to list all their favorite songs in a row, but many like using workout playlists, party mixes, mood playlists, and so on.

How can you solve this issue? You generally have to appeal to third-party apps to do the job for you. Streaming services aren’t trying to lose customers, so you can’t expect them to offer you a feature that helps export your playlists for use with a competing streaming service.

Import Google Music Playlist into Spotify

The Top Contenders

iTunes and Spotify are perhaps the two most popular and widely used music streaming services. But while iTunes is mostly aimed towards Apple users, Spotify can fit the needs of any user.

So where does Google Music rank? It’s not exactly a top contender anymore.

The surging popularity of Spotify, as well as its superior interface, navigation features, and playback, have caused Google Play Music to hit a rut.

Many users have migrated from the old streaming service to enjoying Spotify’s fresher approach. This posed a significant problem, at least for long-time users. How did they get past importing playlists?

The solution is to use apps like the ones in this article.

Stamp

stamp

Importing your Google Music playlists into Spotify doesn’t have to be an arduous process. It doesn’t have to be expensive either.

Using an app like Stamp will allow you to transfer playlists one at a time, for free. This app has a very simple interface.

  • Download the app from here
  • Install Stamp
  • Pick “Google Play Music”
  • Log in
  • Then choose Spotify as the destination

Stamp will let you transfer up to 10 songs per session or one full playlist per session. That is if you use the free version. However, with a Stamp Premium membership, you will have unlimited transfers available.

It’s worth noting that you can also easily export your library in a .csv file. This can help you add your playlists to other incompatible music streaming services in the future.

For example, you can import into iTunes a .csv file that you made in Stamp and then start rebuilding your playlist. Note that some songs might end up missing from your playlist, as the process is not perfect yet.

Soundiiz

Soundiiz

This is a tool that you can use online. There’s no need to install it on your computer or mobile device. The service allows you to use a “platform to platform” feature that transfers or imports playlists from one streaming service to another – in this case, from Google Music to Spotify.

Note that unlike Stamp, this app won’t let you do this for free. However, subscription plans start at just $3 per month and can be canceled at any time. This means that one or two playlist transfers wouldn’t cost you much.

In order to use Soundiiz, you have to create an account on their website. After confirming your email address, select the “Platform to platform” feature. This option is located in the top-right corner of the interface.

Choose Google Music and use your Google credentials to log in. Select your playlists and then select Spotify as the destination.

An Apps for Other Streaming Services: SoundShift

SoundShift

If you’re an Apple user, you can always use SoundShift. This app is available on its official website or from the App Store.

SoundShift has a fairly intuitive interface, and is compatible with Apple Music, Spotify, YouTube, Napster, Pandora, and many more platforms. However, due to the different DRM protections and many incompatibilities between Apple Music and Google Music, SoundShift was never designed to work with Google Music.

A Final Consideration

There are dozens of tech forum threads dedicated to importing Google Play Music playlists into Spotify. Many of these threads focus on sharing code that allows users to export or recreate playlists manually. But if you don’t have time to waste reading countless threads, using one of the previously mentioned apps is your best solution for one-time use.

Learning the coding nuances necessary for working with playlists and music streaming services can be fun, but it’s not for everyone. The $3 Soundiiz fee isn’t too much to pay for the convenience of having all your playlists at hand. If you prefer to save money, just use Stamp for free and do your transfers in multiple smaller steps.

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