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Two Ways to Manage and Disable the Charms Bar in Windows 8

Posted by Jim Tanous on January 19, 2015

The Charms Bar in Windows 8 is the bar of icons that slides in from the right side of the screen when swiping on a touch device, or when clicking in the lower-right or upper-right corners of the screen while using a mouse. This bar houses important functions such as app settings, PC settings, device control, sharing options, and the ability to search your PC or your current app.
windows 8 charms bar
On Windows 8 touch devices, the Charms Bar is generally very useful, but those who use Windows 8 primarily on a desktop with a mouse and keyboard may find it distracting, and may be frustrated by inadvertently triggering the bar when the mouse is moved to the right corners of the screen. To avoid these issues, here are two ways to manage and disable the Charms Bar in Windows 8.1.

Disable the Upper-Right Charms Bar Hot Corner

Some Windows 8 users may want to keep the Charms Bar but just limit the chances of accidentally triggering it with the mouse. To do this, Microsoft provides a user option to disable the hot corner Charms Bar trigger when you move your mouse cursor into the top-right corner of your screen.
windows 8 taskbar properties
Head to your Desktop, right-click on the Taskbar, and choose Properties. In the Taskbar and Navigation Properties window, click on the Navigation tab and uncheck the box labeled “When I point to the upper-right corner, show the charms.”
windows 8 disable charms bar
Click Apply to save your change and move your mouse cursor to the upper-right corner of your screen. You’ll notice that the Charms Bar no longer appears, but you can still access it by moving your mouse to the lower-right corner of the screen. This configuration provides a compromise that allows a user to still access the important functions of the Charms Bar while minimizing the frustration of accidentally triggering it when the mouse cursor moves to the top-right corner of the screen.

Disable the Charms Bar Completely

Other Windows 8 users may just want to kill the Charms Bar completely, at least on the Desktop. There’s no end-user Windows setting that enables this, but you can get this functionality (and more) with a cheap third party app called Start8 ($5). Start8 was originally conceived to bring the Start Menu back to Windows 8, but it also has options that let you disable or control the Charms Bar interface.
Download and install Start8 (there’s a free 30-day trial if you want to check it out first) and open the Start8 Configuration window. This window will automatically launch after installation or you can manually launch it from File Explorer:

C:Program Files (x86)StardockStart8Start8Config.exe

In the Start8 Configuration window, go to the Desktop section and find and check the option labeled “Disable all Windows 8 hot corners when at the Desktop.” There’s no reboot required; your change will be applied as soon as you check the box.
start8 desktop options
As its name implies, this disables all hot corner functionality on the Desktop, including the fast app switcher (upper-left corner of the screen) in addition to both the upper- and lower-right corner Charms Bar triggers. With this option enabled, you can move your mouse around all edges of the Windows 8 Desktop without triggering a menu, bar, or option.
If you’d like more fine-tuned control, you can modify the sub-options in Start8 to only disable the Charms Bar but leave the app switcher enabled, or vice versa. No change is permanent, and you can revert to the default settings at any time by going back into the Start8 options and unchecking the desired box.
The beauty of Start8’s approach is that these options only kill the Charms Bar on the Desktop. When using the Windows 8 Start Screen or a Modern Metro app, the Charms Bar — which is far more useful, and even required in some cases — is still accessible. And, on top of the ability to kill the Charms Bar on the Desktop, users can take advantage of Start8’s primary purpose, which is to reintroduce the Desktop Start Menu.
windows 8 start8 start menu
Many would rightly argue that users shouldn’t have to find third party workarounds to make Windows 8 work the way they want it to, and the company appears to be taking this feedback to heart with the development of the upcoming Windows 10. Until Windows 10 launches in the second half of 2015, however, desktop Windows 8 users can at least make their operating system a bit less frustrating with these two methods of managing or disabling the Charms Bar.

9 thoughts on “Two Ways to Manage and Disable the Charms Bar in Windows 8”

Von Paulus says:
How do I get the standard Windows 7 Start Buitton on the taskbar with your addin? Do I need to create a customer Windows 7 Button image then use that. What size does it need to be?
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Paul says:
That still does not solve the problem for me, as I use the touch-pad on a laptop. I am constantly fighting the urge to just reformat with linux, or at worst just smash the computer to pieces beyond repair.
If microsoft wants me to buy any of their products in the future, they need to make it where charm bar, and other such things that are intended for some users be set so they can be disabled or removed. When writing programs in Basic, C, Pascal, Ada, and all other languages that I have used it is always quite easy to remove features by commenting them out, or add them by UN-commenting that line.
I would modify the binary file myself if I were able to figure out what one, but installing Linux makes more sense at that point, as I would have the control over the computer so it is not doing thing that waste time enough so that I forget what I was working on, and after a while really do not care.
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Chris Nichols says:
Useless info. I have Windows 8.1 with the Classic settings and after hours trying I still cannot get any useful help to remove this annoying “feature”. I unchecked the correct boxes in “Settings” and still the black pop-up returns; when, why and how I don’t know – I just want it gone! I can’t believe Windows is so money hungry they give you something you don’t want or need, then charge you to remove it.
Is there any way to permanently remove those annoying pop-up border menus (from a classic screen, not the modern apps screen) without shelling out more money?
Is there anybody with an answer out there? thanks for anything.
Chris N.
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Paul says:
The easiest way to solve the problem is to backup all your data, and install linux (version of your choice) on the computer, if you do not want to completely remove windows you can setup a dual boot, where it defaults to one operating system and you have time when the computer is first turned on to choose what you want to use.
I’m an engineer, and think of the charm bar much like someone getting herpes. Once they get it they can’t get rid of it as it keeps comming back. I wish I were as careful with what operating system is on this computer as I am sexually…
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sidney orr says:
omg! One of the few windows “features” that is actually manageable.
I’m sure that MS has fired everyone of the gazillion programmers
involved with setting/managing the properties that actually
can be set… j
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AntoxaGray says:
One of most useless and annoying feature that nobody ever use, but sometimes accidentally move mouse in that corner and then wtf why there some thing appeared.
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SunshineSunshineSunshine says:
FUCK YOU miscrosoft for making this ANNOYING “charms” bar! It fucking interrupts with my work every fucking second I use the fucking scroll bar|! FICK you micrfosoft! FUCK YOU!
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Philo Beshte Ya Vyvbz says:
Thanks man. but i need it to display permanently. can i?
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David says:
It’s an awesome paid advertisement for Start8!
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TekRevue says:
This is not a paid endorsement of Start8. Stardock (developer of Start8) neither paid nor even knew of this article prior to its publication. The only paid content we post are sponsorships, which are clearly labeled as such.
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stalin wesley says:
thanks lot
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