A detailed history of the processor

New Mobile Technology (Intel, 2008 – present)

Processors intended for mobile and embedded use are very much needed in our growing mobile-first world. While Intel has met some of that need with variations of Skylake and other processors, the Intel Atom is more of a true mobile processor, as that’s the goal of the Atom — to meet the needs of mobile equipment.

Intel Atom

The Intel Atom originally launched in 2008, aimed at providing a solution for netbooks and a variety of embedded applications in different industries, such as health care. It was originally designed on the 45nm process, but in 2012 was brought all the way down to the 22nm process.  The first generation of Atom processors were actually based on the Bonnell microarchitecture.

Like we said, the Atom is used in many different embedded applications within a variety of industries. In comparison to the rest of the processors we listed, it’s a pretty unknown processor. But, it does power a large amount of health care equipment as well as equipment for other services we use.

Most variations of the Intel Atom have an on-die GPU. And generally, you’re going to see very small clock speeds with the Intel Atom CPUs. Keep in mind that that’s not a bad thing, though. The major differences between Intel’s Core processors and the Atom is that the Atom was designed for extremely low power and low performance applications. Efficiency is key here. That said, an old Core i3 will knock an Atom out of the park in terms of performance any idea. But, there’s no comparison since the two processors have very different goals.

At least for those that follow technology blogs, the Intel Atom made more of a name for itself when Intel partnered with Google in 2012 to provide support for Google’s Android mobile operating system on Intel x86 processors. That said, Intel began offering a new system-on-a-chip (SoC) platform with its Atom line of processors. Early on, there were some overheating issues, but Intel eventually worked out the issues.

Unfortunately, the SoC market is already a crowded industry with fierce competition from Samsung, Qualcomm, NVIDIA, Texas Instruments and so many more. That said, Intel has essentially given up on the smartphone and tablet, throwing away billions of dollars the company spent trying to expand into it. Like we said, it’s a market with fierce competition, and Intel didn’t see a place for itself there anymore. The most recent development is that they cancelled two new Atom chips intended for the smartphone market — Sofia and Broxton. We haven’t heard anything since then.

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30 thoughts on “A detailed history of the processor”

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Avatar James says:
Credit to callum instone or as i call him King CPU love u callum
Avatar James says:
Credit to callum instone or as i call him King CPU love u callum
Avatar James says:
Credit to callum instone or as i call him King CPU love u callum
Avatar roger crouch says:
This article lacks credibility. The first chip of the series was the 8080, then the 8085 was made (the 5 indicating it only needed +5v and ground instead of +-5 and +12) https://www.quora.com/What-is-the-difference-between-8085-and-8086 So the only true thing that can be said about the 8086 was that it was 16bit 8080 processor with improved IC features and more command set.
Avatar Mike Spooner says:
From certain perspectives, the “first chip of the series” was the 4004 (1971), or pehaps the 8008 (1972), the 4040 (1974), 8080 (1974), or…

In fact, the 8080 external interface was distinctly different from the 8086, in idea, not just width – for example, 8080 pin 21 (DMA acknowledge).

The 8086 was (almost) binary compatible with the 8080 for “regular programs” ie: not ones that twiddled ports nor relied on specific interrupt/trap behaviour.

So where do you draw the line? Where does Bob draw it? WHere does Fiona draw it? All in different places, I suspect.

The author obviously chose to draw their line at the 8086, probably because delving back beyond the original IBM PC machines might not be worthwhile given a presumed intended audience…

Avatar roger crouch says:
This article lacks credibility. The first chip of the series was the 8080, then the 8085 was made (the 5 indicating it only needed +5v and ground instead of +-5 and +12) https://www.quora.com/What-is-the-difference-between-8085-and-8086 So the only true thing that can be said about the 8086 was that it was 16bit 8080 processor with improved IC features and more command set.
Avatar Mike Spooner says:
From certain perspectives, the “first chip of the series” was the 4004 (1971), or pehaps the 8008 (1972), the 4040 (1974), 8080 (1974), or…

In fact, the 8080 external interface was distinctly different from the 8086, in idea, not just width – for example, 8080 pin 21 (DMA acknowledge).

The 8086 was (almost) binary compatible with the 8080 for “regular programs” ie: not ones that twiddled ports nor relied on specific interrupt/trap behaviour.

So where do you draw the line? Where does Bob draw it? WHere does Fiona draw it? All in different places, I suspect.

The author obviously chose to draw their line at the 8086, probably because delving back beyond the original IBM PC machines might not be worthwhile given a presumed intended audience…

Avatar roger crouch says:
This article lacks credibility. The first chip of the series was the 8080, then the 8085 was made (the 5 indicating it only needed +5v and ground instead of +-5 and +12) https://www.quora.com/What-is-the-difference-between-8085-and-8086 So the only true thing that can be said about the 8086 was that it was 16bit 8080 processor with improved IC features and more command set.
Avatar Mike Spooner says:
From certain perspectives, the “first chip of the series” was the 4004 (1971), or pehaps the 8008 (1972), the 4040 (1974), 8080 (1974), or…

In fact, the 8080 external interface was distinctly different from the 8086, in idea, not just width – for example, 8080 pin 21 (DMA acknowledge).

The 8086 was (almost) binary compatible with the 8080 for “regular programs” ie: not ones that twiddled ports nor relied on specific interrupt/trap behaviour.

So where do you draw the line? Where does Bob draw it? WHere does Fiona draw it? All in different places, I suspect.

The author obviously chose to draw their line at the 8086, probably because delving back beyond the original IBM PC machines might not be worthwhile given a presumed intended audience…

Avatar amandu benard says:
i love the notes they are precise and straight to key needed aspects thank you very much
Avatar amandu benard says:
i love the notes they are precise and straight to key needed aspects thank you very much
Avatar amandu benard says:
i love the notes they are precise and straight to key needed aspects thank you very much
Avatar slimm says:
thanks for the notess
Avatar slimm says:
thanks for the notess
Avatar slimm says:
thanks for the notess
Avatar prajjwol says:
what is the significances of the number like 8086 in the processor
Avatar prajjwol says:
what is the significances of the number like 8086 in the processor
Avatar prajjwol says:
what is the significances of the number like 8086 in the processor
Avatar jake norfield says:
8085
Avatar Mary Alice Thauvette says:
This article was posted 23-Mar-01. That was nine years ago. It is time to update the article. Or, at least change the title of the last section from :1999 – Present” to “1999 – March 2001”
Avatar Mary Alice Thauvette says:
This article was posted 23-Mar-01. That was nine years ago. It is time to update the article. Or, at least change the title of the last section from :1999 – Present” to “1999 – March 2001”
Avatar Mary Alice Thauvette says:
This article was posted 23-Mar-01. That was nine years ago. It is time to update the article. Or, at least change the title of the last section from :1999 – Present” to “1999 – March 2001”
Avatar chelle-marie says:
that is great i loved the little joke:

“The following chips are considered the dinosaurs of the computer world. PC’s based on these processors are the kind that usually sit around in the garage or warehouse collecting dust. They are not of much use anymore, but us geeks don’t like throwing them out because they still work. You know who you are.”

sounds just like my tech teacher becouse he is always complaining about how things have changed and shows us pictures from back when computers still used tapes and how he used to get paid to change the tapes every two hours for a hospitle

Avatar chelle-marie says:
that is great i loved the little joke:

“The following chips are considered the dinosaurs of the computer world. PC’s based on these processors are the kind that usually sit around in the garage or warehouse collecting dust. They are not of much use anymore, but us geeks don’t like throwing them out because they still work. You know who you are.”

sounds just like my tech teacher becouse he is always complaining about how things have changed and shows us pictures from back when computers still used tapes and how he used to get paid to change the tapes every two hours for a hospitle

Avatar chelle-marie says:
that is great i loved the little joke:

“The following chips are considered the dinosaurs of the computer world. PC’s based on these processors are the kind that usually sit around in the garage or warehouse collecting dust. They are not of much use anymore, but us geeks don’t like throwing them out because they still work. You know who you are.”

sounds just like my tech teacher becouse he is always complaining about how things have changed and shows us pictures from back when computers still used tapes and how he used to get paid to change the tapes every two hours for a hospitle

Avatar steven says:
Really your services are good we like it please keep it up.
Avatar steven says:
Really your services are good we like it please keep it up.
Avatar steven says:
Really your services are good we like it please keep it up.
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Pingback: History of processor!!! - Raymond.CC Forum
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